Will WiMax ever become the mainstream?

WiMaxWhich technology has a better future – Wimax or 3G/LTE (Long Term Evolution)? Will the operators adopt WiMax as 4G solution? This has been a hotly debated subject on the internet/blogs and there are die-hard supporters of both the technologies. I would not like to comment on which is a better technology as this debate is very much like CDMA vs. GSM. Though the jury is yet to be out on which is the better technology of the two (CDMA or GSM) but the business issues like ecosystem development, open platforms, etc. have weighed in favor of GSM and this is evident from the world-wide market share of GSM. Similarly, proponents of WiMax may claim that WiMax is a better technology as compared to LTE or at least similar to LTE in terms of performance as both are OFDMA based. Agreed that LTE is completely a new installation over CDMA based 3G networks and the cost of new installation is similar for both WiMax and LTE. However, the fact of the matter is that the success of any technology is dependent on its ecosystem and the players who offer the technology.

WiMax is being supported by equipment manufacturers like AlcatelLucent, Cisco and chip manufacturer Intel. WiMax is being propped as an alternative to LTE for high speed data networks by these companies. However, it is unlikely that any major operator across the world would migrate from 2G/3G to WiMax. It is clear that the majority of the operators would opt for the 2G/3G/LTE route as the LTE standards for 4G are much more developed than that of WiMax. Even the spectrum band for WiMax has not standardized and is currently available in 3 spectrum bands in different parts of the world. Moreover, with larger number of installations of the GSM networks, there are many more options for consumers for inter-operator roaming. Role of the open and developed eco-system is cannot be ignored in the success of any standard. None of the current major mobile handset and equipment manufacturers barring Motorola are enthusiastic about WiMax. There is no debate in my mind to the fate of WiMax. I believe WiMax as a technology is here to stay but as a support to the LTE or in the area of fixed broadband. It would be complementary to the LTE. The WiMax deployment could happen in the profitable way for the following applications:

Back-haul: WiMax could be used by 3G operators as back haul from cellular base stations to the radio controller instead of copper wire line T1 connections/microwave links/satellite

Last Mile Connectivity: WiMax could be used for fixed broadband access in residential areas where last mile connectivity is not available. Intel is likely to launch dual chips supporting both WiFi and WiMax which would be embedded in all future laptops. This would be a big push for fixed WiMax. Moreover, there are rumors that Intel is contemplating chips for camera that would allow the users to upload the photos directly from the digital camera using WiMax. All this would push fixed WiMax but the mobile WiMax is still out of the picture. The top mobile device vendors have no/limited handset models with WiMax chip and the landscape is unlikely to change anytime soon

Rural: WiMax is likely to be successful in the rural areas in emerging markets due to the vast geographical coverage each WiMax site can provide thus lower the cost of deployment. Fixed WiMax has its reach up to 30 miles radius from the base station though longer distances may result in drop of bit rates. The broadband connectivity will be a boon for tele-medicine, e-Governance and distance education

Back-end Connectivity: WiMax would provide connectivity to WiFi spots

Complementary to 3G: In a few countries like India were the spectrum is scarce, all the carriers may not get the 3G spectrum. In such instances, the not so fortunate carriers may opt for WiMax. Moreover, it is possible that carriers offer a combination of 3G/WiMax to lower the costs. Urban areas could be on 3G and rural areas on WiMax. If this situation develops in many countries, the handset with dual chip (3G+WiMax) would benefit

To summarize, the winner is likely to be LTE purely due to the business issues of developed standards and eco-sy

stem rather than on strength of technology. WiMax may never become the mainstream or predominant technology but it would have its own space as a technology complementary to 3G/LTE. It is likely that in future, WiMax may converge with the LTE-TDD standards as evident from the quote of AlcatelLucent’s CEO, Ben Verwaayen – “AlcatelLucent intends to lead the long-awaited convergence of WiMax and LTE-TDD standards in the coming years, as we believe the market cannot afford to support two competing 4G technologies”

Related Posts:

Leave a Reply

9 Comments on "Will WiMax ever become the mainstream?"

avatar

Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous
7 years 5 months ago
“the LTE standards for 4G are much more developed than that of WiMax” – wrong – LTE is nearly complete. 802.16e was complete in 2005. “the spectrum band for WiMax has not standardized” – wrong – there are 2 primary bands being used: 2.5 (2.3 to 2.7) and 3.5 (3.3 to 3.8). LTE is being considered in so many different bands of new and existing spectrum. “there are many more options for consumers for inter-operator roaming” – only if you have a multimode device with 2G/3G/LTE. You can do the same for WiMAX. “Role of the open and developed eco-system”… Read more »
Samuel
Guest
Samuel
7 years 4 months ago
From what I understand, LTE is the natural upgrade path for GSM/UMTS/HSPA, thus the installed base for these technologies alone will predict LTE as the clear winner for Tier 1 industrialized nations. The marketing power for GSM technologies alone should be able to retain 80% of the world’s installed base of cellular that GSM has. Next, the three major wireless carriers in the US — Verizon Wireless (CDMA), AT&T and T-Mobile have all announced LTE plans. Whenever two technologies perform the same function, the one with the larger installed base wins. Critics will point out that LTE has no installed… Read more »
George Sarmonikas
Guest
7 years 4 months ago
WIMAX is mainstream but not in the broadband developed markets. It is booming in markets and areas where broadband penetration is still very low i.e. India, Indonesia, South East Asia, Africa and Latin America. For the mobile network operators who already own spectrum on 2G or 3G bands, the preferred solution is of course LTE. There is no point for them to deploy mobile Wimax since their customers are accustomed to the 3G-related ecosystem (i.e. handsets, HSPA USB dongles etc.). In addition to that, in many regions/markets, the available spectrum for Mobile Wimax is 3.5GHz which is prohibiting for urban/suburban… Read more »
Robert Syputa
Guest
Robert Syputa
7 years 4 months ago
WiMAX has become mainstream because it has shifted the evolutionary path for the entire wireless industry. Prior to the 802.16/WiMAX ecosystem having gained momentum, 3GPP/3GPP2 had next generation efforts beyond CDMA/WCDMA on the back burner for 2014-2016 . And there was malformed resolution about what set of technologies would be used: TD-SCDMA, Coded OFDM, and other technologies were proposed by DoCoMo, Qualcomm, Ericsson and others. Your own company, Nokia (networking group), was involved in 802.16 from an early stage but then dropped out saying that WiMAX/802.16 had little future as a mainstream wireless effort. But, surprise, surprise, Nokia jumped back… Read more »
djkoeman
Guest
djkoeman
7 years 1 month ago

Robert, I would be very interested in your report!

Daryl Schoolar
Guest
Daryl Schoolar
7 years 4 months ago

Mainstream really depends on the market you are addressing. I don’t believe WiMAX and LTE primary targets are actually the same. If your question is which technology will ship more base stations, right now I would have to say LTE.

Rob Mortimer
Guest
7 years 4 months ago
I would have to agree with Daryl, LTE does look to have the ‘edge’ on WiMAX. There is still a very big market that WiMAX will address, but it would seem that WiMAX is starting to lose ground to LTE. Where WiMAX will win through is in the next generation of WISP’s who have spectrum, need more from their network and want to add some mobility. The ‘big’ guys, certainly over this side of the world, probably only see the opportunity of WiMAX as data traffic offload from already bursting networks. There is a case that WiMAX will become mainstream… Read more »
Tom Foale
Guest
7 years 4 months ago
Many people seem to assume that WiMAX and LTE occupy the same market space. I don’t believe that is true. It all depends on the business models deployed in each case. LTE can’t serve all potential markets on one network and neither can WiMAX. The mobile operators are making very nice margins and will not cannibalise those to serve other data markets, but these markets can be a profitable niche for a WiMAX start-up with a significantly lower cost base that does not have to offer mobile telephony at all. The idea of WiMAX as a rural play, at least… Read more »
djkoeman
Guest
djkoeman
7 years 1 month ago

I see yet another use case for WiMax in countries like The Netherlands: a closed (large enterprise) long range data eco-system, where WiFi is not doing the trick. For instance, in the port of Rotterdam where off-shore pilots require up-to-date info on weather, tides, currents, etc. Perhaps even drilling platforms…

wpDiscuz